Root Canal Treatment Harrow, North London | Root Canal Dentist
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What is Root Canal?

We can take away the pain and discomfort from tooth infection

Root canal treatment is a dental procedure used to remove infection at the centre of your tooth to alleviate pain and prevent you losing your tooth.

The treatment is intended to eliminate the infected pulp in the tooth and protect the decontaminated tooth from future microbial invasion. The tooth is then sealed with a filling or a crown, so the structure of the tooth is maintained.

A root canal procedure sounds scary, but with today’s technology, it’s typically not a whole lot more different than having a deep filling. There’s little to no pain because your root canal specialist will use local anaesthesia to numb your tooth and gums so you’re comfortable during the procedure.

The root canal treatment leaves your natural tooth in place and prevents further decay, but it also makes the tooth more fragile, this is why a filling or crown is fitted.

For more information regarding this treatment give us a call, 020 4541 1150 and we will be more than happy to assist you in any way.

What’s involved with a root canal treatment?

A root canal may require one or more visits to the root canal dentist. An x-ray will be taken to see the shape of the root canals. Local anesthesia is used to numb the area surrounding the tooth and make the patient more comfortable. A sheet of rubber will be placed around the tooth (a rubber dam) to prevent the area becoming wet from saliva. A hole will then be drilled into the infected tooth so the dentist can remove the pulp and clean the canal. Once the tooth is thoroughly cleaned, it is sealed. A crown or filling will be used to restore the tooth following the procedure.

Root Treatment

What are the Symptoms You May Need a Root Canal For?

Signs that you may need a root canal  therapy:
• Severe toothache, usually when chewing.
• Prolonged sensitivity when teeth are exposed to hot or cold temperatures.
• The infected tooth may darken in colour.
• You may also experience tenderness and swelling in the gum area surrounding the infected tooth.
• You may get a persistent pimple on the gums.

The best treatment to save your smile

What causes the need for root canal treatment?

A tooth’s nerve and pulp can become infected due to various dental procedures or trauma of the face or teeth. If left untreated, it could lead to bigger problems such as an abscessed tooth which is a serious infection in the jaw bone that may need root canal surgery if not treated quickly enough.
A tooth with an infection will start to decay and the roots can become infected. When this happens, pus or other decayed debris may build up near your gum line as well as in between the root canal of a tooth’s narrow opening.

Before After

Although it might sound unpleasant, a root canal is a relatively painless procedure that could save your teeth and maintain your healthy smile.

Root Canal

Root canals have a high success rate and with the crown or filling covering the signs of infection, you won’t be able to see any visual signs of the procedure.

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How Much Does a Root Canal Cost?

Root canal treatment costs can vary depending on the area affected by the infection. The treatment is fairly straightforward and can alleviate pain from infection and save your tooth.

£75

Root Canal Treatment Consultation with Specialist

We have root canal specialists at Complete Smiles that are highly skilled to give you the best treatment.

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From £350

Root treatment *Incisors/Canines/Premolars)

These teeth generally only have one canal so you can expect treatment to last 30-60 minutes.

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From £495

Root treatment (molars)

By specialist only.

As molars are at the back of the mouth and have up to four canals, this treatment can take longer (up to 90 minutes).

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Root Canal Treatment FAQs

A root canal is a process in which the nerve and pulp are removed from an infected tooth, then it's cleaned out. Without treatment, infection will form around your mouth that can lead to abscesses. Root canal is the natural cavity of a tooth, containing its nerve. What seems like an empty space within your teeth may be full of nerves - don't forget to brush those! Having a tooth with or without a nerve will not affect the day-to-day functioning of your teeth. The only function is feeling hot, cold and other sensations.

A tooth with an infection will start to decay and the roots can become infected. When this happens, pus or other decayed debris may build up near your gum line as well as in between the root canal of a tooth's narrow opening. The pain is usually what alerts you that there might be something wrong with one of these teeth so it’s important to keep your dental appointments! Other symptoms may include swelling that can spread to the face, neck, and head, as well as bone loss around the tip of the root. A tooth can also begin to exhibit drainage with the surrounding gum becoming inflamed. A hole in a tooth is possible, leading to infected gums or skin further downstream from the site of teeth decay.

A tooth's nerve and pulp can become infected due to various dental procedures or trauma of the face or teeth. If left untreated, it could lead to bigger problems such as an abscessed tooth which is a serious infection in the jaw bone that may need surgery if not treated quickly enough.

Signs that you may need a root canal can include severe toothache, usually when chewing. You might suffer from prolonged sensitivity when teeth are exposed to hot or cold temperatures. The infected tooth may darken in colour. You may also experience tenderness and swelling in the gum area surrounding the infected tooth, and get a persistent pimple on the gums.

A root canal may require one or more visits to the dentist. An x-ray will be taken to see the shape of the root canals and determine if there are any signs of infection. Local anesthesia is used to numb the area surrounding the tooth and make the patient more comfortable. A sheet of rubber will be placed around the tooth (a rubber dam) to prevent the area becoming wet from saliva. A hole will then be drilled into the infected tooth. The dentist will then remove the pulp along with bacteria, the decayed nerve tissue and any debris. Root canal files are then used to clean the canal. Water or sodium hypochlorite is used to flush away the debris. Once the tooth is thoroughly cleaned, it is sealed. There are a few different schools of thought about when to seal the tooth. Some dentists may choose to wait and seal your tooth in seven days if you have an infection, while others will do it on the same day as cleaning. If they haven't completed root canal work during that appointment, then some temporary filling comes into play until next time around! The tooth is filled with a sealer paste and gutta percha rubber compound, which will help protect the area from future infection. A filling to cover up any remaining hole in your teeth created at the beginning of treatment may also be placed before you leave. Finally it's time for restoration; all that remains now are minor cosmetic changes like replacing what little was removed or having an artificial crown put on top of your natural one so as not to risk breakage later down the road when chewing becomes more vigorous again after healing has taken place.

Root canals do have the reputation of being painful, however most people find them no more painful than having a filling placed.

The tooth may feel sensitive for the first few days due to tissue inflammation, especially if there was pain or infection prior to the procedure. Most patients find they can return to normal the next day, but if you do feel discomfort you can use normal pain medication such as Ibuprofen to help. Until the permanent filling is in place and/or the crown and the full procedure complete, avoid chewing on the tooth being repaired. This will help avoid further infection or the risk of the tooth breaking before it can be fully restored. Following a root canal you can brush and floss as you regularly would and see your dentist for check-ups as normal.

In 95% of cases the root canal will be successful and should last a lifetime, and the crown or filling will cover any visual signs of the procedure.

Very rarely there can be complications following a root canal. This could be a result of having more than one hole or crack in your tooth that wasn’t treated in the first procedure. It could also be down to the restoration not sealing the area completely, allowing bacteria to reinfect the tooth. If you do suffer complications, another root canal can be done. If it’s not possible to perform the procedure again, apicoectomy surgery can be tried. This is a minor surgery, also known as root end surgery, which removes the very tip of the tooth’s root.

Why Choose Us as Your Root Canal Specialist?

  • We're open 7 days a week with flexible opening hours
  • Highly qualified & patient-focused team with experienced dentist.
  • FREE internet access
  • Modern facilities with bespoke interior design
  • Spacious sitting area will put you at ease and is a great place to relax both before and after your dental treatment.
  • Over 940 Parking spaces at St Ann´s Car Park (£2.00 for 2 hours)
  • Our fully computerised record keeping & administration ensures maximum efficiency with online booking, emailing and text messaging.
  • Non-judgemental diagnosis. We're not here to judge; all we want is to improve your oral health.

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